The Body as Teacher: What I’ve Learned Beyond the Power of Pilates

The human body is a terrific teacher; a miraculous, complex multi-layered marvel that most of us know very little about. In our Western world that spends so much time focused externally on the material world and identified with the mind, it’s important to consistently stop , find moments of stillness and quiet, and trust the body’s intuition and wisdom. Personally, I do this through daily meditation practice and by consistently moving my body in ways that allow for me to be more fully present with my breath and in my body.

I’m continually reminded that simply “thinking things through” or strong determination can force an outcome; however, it might not be the wisest one.  In fact, from a spiritual perspective, thinking it through and making things happen by sheer will are the least effective ways to encourage healing and nourish transformation.

Although I’m over twenty years into the practice of Pilates, and recognize the numerous benefits of Pilates, I continue to be most inspired by the body’s ability to change and heal, and transform.

My own transformation through movement and passion for mind/body medicine informs my teaching as well as the way I live and move in the world. It gives me great pleasure to share this with hundreds of clients, students and fellow Pilates instructors, whether individually, in small groups or in retreat settings.

It’s inspiring and rewarding to see clients empowered, confident and awakened to the experience of vibrant health  as they experience the external changes of  better posture, flexibility, a strong core, improved balance, defined muscles and increased grace of movement.  On a deeper level, the benefits of relaxation and sound sleep help to decrease anxiety and stress, promoting an overall feeling of ease and calm.

A piece of movement or a moment in time, even, continuous, connected to our breath, centered in our body, is a beautiful thing, and a profound way to experience our natural and creative selves.

Part Five of Five of the article: “An Unexpected Cure: My Journey from Pain to the Transformative Power of Pilates” by Geneviève Nedder.

Sleep better with Neurexan and relax.

Improve your sleep! Use Neurexan.

How many hours of sleep a night do you get?  Sleep better with Neurexan.

There are several Stages of sleep: Light Sleep which is between sleeping and being awake. Then your body starts to relax its muscles and regulate its breathing.  When your body starts to fully relax,  your breathing slows down. This is when your muscles receive more blood, your energy is restored,  and needed hormones are released. Then, REM sleep. Rapid Eye Movement. During this time  your muscles are completely relaxed, your body is releasing hormones fully and your brain is busy dreaming.

Neurexan is a safe, homeopathic sleep aid. It can be taken alone or with other medications. Neurexan can help you sleep better at night.  There are no known side effects from taking this product. It’s also helpful for over active mind and anxiety. Many of you have asked me if i use this product.  I have and i do.  I’m sensitive to prescription medications and  try to avoid taking them if at all possible.  On  nights when I’m keyed up and my usual evening  rituals aren’t enough to relax my mind or body,  I take a Neurexan.  If it’s been a particularly stressful day, then i  take more than one.  The instructions are on the bottle and we have a brochure at the studio if you’d like more information.

 

[Read more…]

Talk Less, Breathe More.

stones and ocean
Practice breathing with every movement.

Breath is Life. And as we know from Vedanta philosophy, Yoga and Meditation, “Where attention goes, energy flows.”

Take a moment to center yourself before moving by bringing your attention to your breath.  Fill up your lungs  on your inhalation, empty your lungs on your exhalation. Let your breath be easy and soft to begin.

Try connecting your breath your to your  movement during your pilates sessions this week. Be easy with  your breath and your body. Try not to make this a strong effort. There is tremendous power in learning how to move without tension.  Our bodies are designed to move well and with ease.  They’re designed to move freely. Increase your awareness of how and where you hold tension.  If you’re holding your breath,  pause, slow down and consciously exhale.  Try  to practice without a lot of chatter, internally or externally.

Talk less , Breathe more.

The benefits of this kind of awareness and focus on your breath encourages calm and relaxation,  helps focus muscular engagement and release,  and allows for ease of movement.

Keep Breathing,

 

emailavatarb3               Keep Breathing words on top of nature photo

 

Previously Published in October 2011