Recovering from an Injury #4

bailey_200x200The Lesson in Taking the Time It Takes

“Appearance is absolute, but reality is not that way.
Everything is interdependent, not absolute.” Dalai Lama
Taking Charge: Self-Guided Recovery

To be pain-free is often confused with being ready to pick up right where you left off. The problem is that athletic skills require a commensurate level of strength to execute without injury. Strength builds in increments. Nobody wants to start over when they graduated years ago! What you believe you can do is indeed what causes everything to change—and sometimes not for the better if the reality of an appropriate starting point is ignored.

Say, for example, you could ride a bike for more than an hour before one knee started hurting so badly you could not ride at all. You have no clue what happened or what you did that caused this problem. The first order of business is to review or rule out possible issues including, but not limited to, the following:

• Proper adjustment and fit for all gear
• Dietary cause of inflammation such as allergy or excessive sugar intake
• Joint injury requiring surgical intervention
• Muscular imbalance
• Improper technique
• Genetic predispositions and conformation factors
• Overtraining or inadequate rest
Get the help and advice necessary to make informed decisions. Talk with people who’ve been through something similar as well as professionals. Your network plays a major role in long term fitness and health. If cross training is indicated to build a better foundation, go for it. This is a pay now, or pay dearly later, life moment. Knees and shoulders are missed once they are gone.

Assuming all of the aforementioned have been either ruled out or confirmed and corrective action taken, a great plan for the first solo ride on the bike might be slowly spinning for 5 minutes in front of a mirror to watch alignment, going both forward and backward. Then a wait to see what happens. No news is good news since that means you get to do it again instead of wait even longer for new pain to go away. More is not better. It is just more. The lesson of increments means to work smarter rather than harder.

To keep moving forward is to quit while you are ahead; that means to stop on a good one instead of pushing into fatigue. Hold the belief that smart work will continue the upward trend. Use the rear view in this instance for a quick survey to establish progress and perspective. A relative progress check is a one to two-week previous comparative, and the perspective check is 2-4 months back depending on the nature of the injury. Absent pain, the finding of no progress is a red flag that indicates a consult or program revision is necessary. No more and no less.

Doing just enough is the key. Being willing to discover what just enough means for you as an individual is the tipping point of reclaiming active health.

Recovering from an Injury part #3

bailey_200x200By Guest Writer Diana Bailey

“Appearance is absolute, but reality is not that way.
Everything is interdependent, not absolute.” Dalai Lama
Taking Charge: Self Guided Recovery

 

At a certain point, you may choose to guide your own program. If you look to activities that are familiar, enjoyable, and easy, the results are usually okay. Let pain be your guide. If it still hurts, you really are better off getting some help or at least finding an activity that does not cause pain. When you find one, do parts of it differently so the answer (what you “should” be doing) is not immediately apparent. The change of context reduces reflexive guarding and rebuilds confidence if the challenge is appropriate. An appropriate challenge means there is no pain in the doing and none after!

High pain tolerance is not your friend when it comes to injury because it results in ignoring important warnings or overdoing. Low pain tolerance and micro-focusing on pain is not useful either. Developing an accurate pain scale is worthwhile; that means you know the difference between the discomfort that may be necessary to reclaim motion, and a warning that something is about to get serious. In the beginning, the distance between those two points, and the time to respond, is small. Moving and working slowly provides the space to back off. Enduring and ignoring are not the same as noticing and exploring.
The goal is to accurately interpret the message and respond.

Begin any activity with very short exposures. A marathon runner with over 20 years of experience once told me she begins with about a ten minute run her first time back. That idea seemed wimpy and stupid. The real lesson came from first ignoring her suggestion, and then, after another setback, trying it.

Experience teaches what direction cannot.

In the beginning, it has to feel like nothing! No pain means all gain every time. A “wait and see” attitude pays off big in early trials. The discipline to stick with a plan, and to stop before there is an issue, is far more important than any single workout.

Recovering from an Injury- part 2

bailey_200x200Recovering from an Injury-Part 2
By Diana Bailey

To continue treating the body like a machine ensures installation or removal of a few parts over time. Approaching any injury with the attitude of “let’s get this over with” means it may be over or, at the very least end quite differently than was hoped. There is no magic bullet to put this life event away. Cutting and medicating, no matter how necessary in the moment, address a symptom rather than the abiding issue. This path is understandable because the human tendency is to fix what can be seen and touched rather than what is believed. The results speak for themselves.

Absent direction from a professional, and often even in spite of it, injuries are rarely viewed as a personal reason for more accurate observation and examination of underlying mental habits. Damage to the body is not somehow separate from the decisions that caused it. To ignore, blame, justify, or rationalize this critical aspect of the injury won’t make next time not happen.

Gravity exists whether we believe it or not.
Lack of belief merely guarantees another painful outcome.

It is a curious truth that when people get beat up enough, they become willing to entertain new options. Injury is an indicator that at the very least, a review of mental habits is warranted.

The more you are able to abandon your “self” to the process, the more productively rehabilitation time will be used. Rest assured that if you hug your diagnosis, it will never let go of you first! Ignoring a diagnosis ensures other consequences, because ignoring something does not make it go away. The best use of any qualified opinion is as a place to begin rather than the final answer.

Both physical therapy and post-rehab Pilates essentially conspire to take every day motions out of context in order to restore physical ability. The movement is the same, but the reason for doing it becomes different. So, there is no fixed idea about what “should” happen. Curiosity is the root of recovery. This necessary shift in perspective, provided by varying the context, makes a place for possibilities rather than conclusions. In effect, people see and do what they could not before because their mind was too certain of the result.

Once awareness has expanded and the body learns that it can again move without pain, confidence returns along with more efficient movement. Guarding* disappears. Pain ceases to chip away at peace of mind. If you can’t find a way to move pain free, get help! There are people who can teach you how, and this is worth every penny with respect to quality of life.

Change does not have to be difficult, but it may test some limits. Great teachers can make necessary moments doable and even enjoyable. The essential ingredient is to train awareness over exercises. The moment awareness broadens, capacity shifts. A great teacher won’t ask outright for a change of belief, but you may later discover you have because it made sense to do so.
*Guarding is the body’s automatic reaction to delay or avoid pain. At first, this happens to protect the muscles and joints involved. Guarding is evidenced by restricted movements that partially or totally bypass the use of the painful area. The long term result, if the guarding remains, is an adaptive pattern that eventually causes further dysfunction and pain.

 

 

Recovering from an Injury -Part 1

 

bailey_200x200By Guest Writer Diana Bailey
Part  1

“Appearance is absolute, but reality is not that way.
Everything is interdependent, not absolute.” Dalai Lama
The Overview and Approach

Personal and practical experience with a multitude of soft tissue injuries indicates that the attitude regarding rehab challenges does more to determine the outcome than even the available level of care. It is clear that over the course of a lifetime injury is likely to occur. The usual mental approach arrives as a scale that ranges from inconvenient to completely devastating. Injuries do feel absolute! It takes a split second to happen, and a relatively long time to “get your body back”.

In simple terms, recovery from damage tends to unfold in a couple of ways depending upon personal outlook:

Believe first. Do second. Understand later
Do first. Believe second. Understand later

In between, regardless of choosing to be an optimist or a skeptic, there will be some aching, some ouches, and several wows!

The pivotal issue in recovery for either personality is actually curiosity; that means to become more interested in what will happen next than afraid of it. While expert guidance is useful and important, direction that inspires genuine interest in the process expands the realm of probability. Focused curiosity is a powerful tool for progress. Healing is easier when a question of wonder helps to engage the necessary work.

The greatest lesson an injury has to teach is not patience.

It is to pay attention.

It’s called paying attention because it is an investment.

Understanding is at the end of recovery for the same reason that rear view mirrors are smaller than windshields. Perspective comes from experience, not just hindsight. It saves a lot of potential problems to get assistance formulating a plan, but that does not mean mistakes won’t occur. Setbacks can and do happen even with the best of plans because knowing what is just enough is for one individual on any given day is an experiment.

If you decide to seek professional advice, look for experience over opinion and results over credentials. Everybody has opinions, and there are lots of credentials. These are a great starting place as long as they are not equated with experience. People who have paid their dues on the front lines look at issues very differently. Their wisdom is priceless in helping to set a constructive frame for a return to a full range of movement.

Keep in mind that incremental goals deliver excellent cumulative results. Historically, giant leaps in capacity are often injurious. Re-injury halfway through the process tends to expand the problem, and interfere with happy endings. It works well to get reliable information, go slower, and take a little longer. Sometimes that’s a lot longer than expected. Injuries take the time they take. To be invited and inspired to learn how your body moves and works best for you is the goal of recovery.

 

 

How to approach yourself in movement.

Diana Bailey Essential Motion PilatesLet your Brownies bake!
By Guest Writer Diana Bailey

Approach your work in Pilates with this general frame of awareness:

  • stsack of brownies.First you organize yourself in the movement much
    as you would assemble and mix ingredients to bake.

Second you refine the mix and maybe make a couple
of adjustments.

     The last and most important thing is to let it bake.

                                                   In my experience, I have to train myself to do this. To
accept whatever happens.

                                                           Brownies do not cook if you keep opening the oven and poking them. So cut it out!  Have some fun with it and give yourself permission to be okay with today’s result.   Practice leaving room for more AND being happy with what is.

 

Tell A Different Story

Diana Bailey Essential Motion Pilates By  Guest Writer, Diana Bailey

Acceptance is the starting place. It has nothing to do with being a “door mat” by allowing others to make decisions that are yours to make. It is not about giving up, giving in, or tolerating particular circumstances and behavior. Acceptance is seeing something for what it objectively is, so you can be free to decide how you want to respond. It is the ability to drop or question your beliefs in order to act wholeheartedly. It does not magically appear or disappear. You choose it.

There’s a joke that makes the rounds in Colorado every winter that is a great example of acceptance:

Know how you can tell you’re driving in the snow with a Colorado native? Because the car’s sliding sideways into oncoming traffic, and they ask you to hold their coffee ‘cause this is gonna get interesting….

Freedom to act comes from the ability to consciously direct the mind to observe and acknowledge what is happening right now. That’s acceptance. No resentment, no why me? No more the entitled approach of I deserve this, but I don’t deserve that. No he should have, or I could have. No leap to the aftermath of mopping up a coffee stain on car upholstery. Just this: Here we are. This is it, and NOW WHAT?

The story becomes entirely different. That’s what.

Acceptance underpins creativity because it is the receiver; the heartfelt seeing of a person, place or thing for what it is without dressing it up or tearing it down. It is the simple realization that there is no real control of any outcome…. especially for anyone or anything else. That understanding alone will make a positive difference in whatever the outcome actually is.

This simple spiritual principle dramatically changes every situation without adding any personal drama. Imagine one guest or family member in the room at a holiday gathering who was truly still inside…no drama. Talk about a social magnet. Acceptance remains clear that there is no reason to make anyone else’s drama yours. What for?

Acceptance abides with the personal responsibility that lies behind a choice to do or not do, think or not think, say or not say.

For me, this simple practice is moving forward at peace with what is here, what was before and what may or may not be. That’s a “now what?” that makes getting up in the morning a great idea, an engaging and expansive look at being here and doing what I’m doing today with all that I am.

 

 

 

Top 7 Tools for Living a Happier, Healthier Life – Part 1

by guest writer Heidi Hackler, CHHC

As a holistic health and wellness coach, I work with people on a daily basis to help them kick-start a healthier life. But I was not always so healthy myself, so I know what it’s like to turn your life around.

I grew up with a healthy eating foundation from my back-to-nature granola mom who wore Birkenstocks before they were cool. So naturally, as soon as I left for college I couldn’t get my hands on enough junk food and candy. Sound familiar?

By my mid-30’s I was diagnosed with celiac disease and dairy and egg allergies, and had to drastically change my diet. That was over 15-years ago before most people knew what Celiac was, and there were not nearly as many gluten-free options available then. Luckily the wisdom of my mom’s teachings came back to me and I was able to make healthy diet and lifestyle changes and turn my health around.

Here are the top 7 tools I personally employ and recommend to my clients to help them kick-start a healthier life.

Tools 1-3 for Living a Happier, Healthier Life

1. Drink More Waterclean clear water in glass

The human body is about 65% water. Your body uses water to flush out toxins, stay hydrated, and function properly. Here are a few compelling reasons to drink more water:

  • Staying hydrated is very important to many functions of the body. Your blood is 55% water, so when you become dehydrated your blood moves more slowly and can clot easier.
  • Your brain also needs water to stay hydrated and function and think properly.
  • One of the first symptoms of dehydration is clumsiness. If you stumble, trip, or fall, or bump into the edge of a desk, table or wall, it may be a sign you are dehydrated. When this happens to me I always go for a tall glass of water. A headache can be another sign of dehydration.
  • Drinking water can also help you to lose weight. Drinking a glass of water 20 minutes before each meal can help you to feel full so you eat less during your meal. That water also helps to flush out toxins that can build up in your fat cells, causing the cells to retain more fat.
  • A good rule of thumb is to drink half your body weight in ounces of water per day. For example, if you weigh 150lbs you would drink 75oz of water per day. This is on top of any coffee, tea, and other beverages you may already be drinking.

2. Eat Less Sugar

Refined sugar is the most inflammatory food you can eat. Although it may seem daunting to avoid sugar, these startling facts really helped me to kick my sweet tooth:

  • Sugar is 8 times more addictive than Cocaine. If sugar were developed today, it would be considered a narcotic.
  • The average American now consumes almost 1 cup of sugar a day, in soft drinks and hiding in nearly all processed foods, including foods like yogurt and spaghetti sauce.
  • Cancer tumors thrive and grow on sugar, in fact, cancer cells have eight-times the sugar receptors of normal cells. That is why PET Scans, used to detect cancer, require drinking radioactive glucose (sugar-water) — the PET Scan actually follows the radiated sugar-water straight to the tumors.
  • Doctors and scientists now know that sugar (not fat) causes plaque build-up in the arteries and brain, which can tear off and cause clots and strokes.
  • Plaque in the brain can lead to Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. Alzheimer’s is now being referred to as Type 3 Diabetes because there is a direct correlation between high blood sugar, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s.

So these are all very compelling reasons to cut back on sugar consumption if you ask me. But how do you cut out that sugar that you are craving so much? Here are some tips to help:

  • Start by crowding sugar out and filling up on more healthy foods.
  • Sometimes a sugar craving can actually indicate a lack of protein in the diet. So if you are craving sugar, first drink a glass of water. Then eat some protein. Then see if you still really need that sugar.
  • Add in more sweet vegetables to your diet like sweet potatoes, sweet peppers, carrots, artichokes and artichoke hearts, and low glycemic fruits like apples, berries, pears, kiwis, and melons.
  • You’ll be amazed but once you cut sugar out for 7-10 days, (the length of time for your taste buds to regenerate) everything you eat will taste much sweeter with out sugar hijacking your taste buds.
  • A good rule of thumb is no more than 26 grams (6 teaspoons) of added sugar per day. That is less that one can of soda.

3. Read Labels

This is a big one; especially so you can figure out how much sugar you are really eating. The more you know about what you are putting into and onto your body, the healthier you will ultimately be. The main things I recommend looking for when you read labels are:

  • Trans fat — avoid trans fats, found in hydrogenated and partially hydrogenated vegetable oils. Eating trans fats promotes chronic inflammation, which has been linked to heart disease, stroke, diabetes, dementia, and some cancers.
  • Sugar content — avoid artificial sweeteners (aspartame, sucralose, saccharine), which have been linked to cancer and ironically even diabetes and weight gain. The human body cannot digest artificial sweeteners, so they end up being stored as fat in the liver. A fatty liver can’t properly cleanse your blood and detox your body. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease has increased significantly in the past 20 years, following the increase in artificial sugar consumption.
  • Sodium content — aim for one teaspoon or less of sodium per day (2,400 milligrams), most people around the world consume three-to-four times the sodium that the body actually needs to function.
  • Non-GMO — Just say NO to GMO. The jury is still out on GMOs. There has not been enough scientific evidence to prove that they are not harmful. And in fact there is some research out of Europe to indicate that glyphosate (found in Round-up and Monsanto GMO grains) damages our gut bacteria, which play a critical role not only in digestion, but in our health and well being too. Note that most all soy and canola grown in the US and Canada is GMO unless specifically certified organic or Non-GMO.

These first three tools are a great place to start making healthier lifestyle changes. Take them once step at a time. No need to rush and feel daunted by trying everything at once. This week try drinking an extra glass or two of water per day. Then next week try adding more colors to your plate. The third week you might start to look at labels, and so on.

Stay tuned for Tools 4-7 to help you continue on your healthy lifestyle journey!

I offer a free Kick-Start Your Health Strategy Session, and virtual holistic health and wellness coaching to help you through these steps. Please contact me for more info.

Heidi Hackler of Happy Well LifestyleHeidi Hackler is a Certified Holistic Health Coach (CHHC) and blogger, who received her training from the Institute for Integrative Nutrition (IIN). She Inspires Healthy Habits Into Action via her blog at HappyWellLifestyle.com, and her holistic health coaching programs. She has also written articles for Happiness + Wellbeing Magazine, and blogs for Chopra Centered Lifestyle.
 
Heidi lives with her husband and two kittens aboard their 40’ sailboat. They have a zest for living the Happy Well Lifestyle: a happy, healthy, active, fun-filled life where they practice yoga and meditation, eat a gluten-free, dairy-free, veg-aquarian diet, and laugh a lot. She welcomes new followers at:

 

A Thought is Movement, Paul Rohrer

Greetings from 6200 feet. It is a great privilege to write for those who recognize the importance of movement. The very word defines change. A thought is movement. Movement of electrical impulses in the brain, referred to as synapses, which trigger ideas, thoughts and action. Action is what I am taking at this very moment. Writing the first (in what I hope are many) shared blogs with Genevieve. The most remarkable pillar of the Pilates “movement” I have ever met. Excuse me while I digress a moment to expound.

I met Geneviève years ago in Denver as an actress and a darned good one at that! As we got to know one another, I was able to let her know that as an extreme athlete in my youth, I had practically destroyed every major joint and their function in my body. Surgery was unavoidable for my knees and lower back but I was not about to let surgeons cut into my shoulders which I had torn some 20 years earlier. I was quickly gaining weight, losing mobility and in constant pain. Geneviève in her patient, caring and always supportive gentility, allowed me to discover the miraculous alternative to regaining mobility, strength and above all. . . HOPE! I know that is why each and every one of you reading this, love Genevieve. I mean, look at her! She still looks as young, vibrant and beautiful as the day I met her!

Thank you for taking that divergence with me.

Genevieve’s thoughtful and powerful introduction of how I would no longer need to POUND and JOLT and FORCE my ailing body into submission, rather through gentle stretching and simple motions, I could once again regain everything I need to feel better, look better and do better! All it would take (like anything worth much) is commitment, patience and a passion to CHANGE.

A blog entitled “Changing Through Movement” may then, by definition, be considered redundant. (Written in the department of redundancy department.) But that is why I love the title so much. We apply what we learn best through repetition. One thought of what you want to remember, means you will usually forget. One abdominal crunch . . . one look . . . one . . . “One is the loneliest number. . . ” But again I digress. The point I wanted to make before I so rudely interrupted myself, is that in our “microwave society” we want everything now. Great looking bodies, strong rapid-acting minds, mature, healthy and polite children (even though they were born last week and just pooped with a loud fart in their diaper) what the heck, they feel better! But the fact is, most pharmaceuticals are about as helpful as that diet soda and as is whatever excuse we use to be “right” instead of healthy, happy, loving and alive.

In these posts, I look forward to getting to know all of you better, as you are now somewhat aware of my sick, demented sense of humor – that like aging, we must all adopt or forever become cynical, depressed, anxious blobs of disgusting worthlessness bickering about why our lives are so bad, when we have the POWER to CHANGE, to MOVE, to love, live and laugh. Now stand up. Breathe deep and laugh. It’ll do ya good.

Sincerely,
Paul

paul--guest-writer

 

Mistakes, magic and success

Diana Bailey Essential Motion Pilates

By Diana Bailey
“A mistake is simply another way of
doing things.” Katharine Graham
Keep in mind that to give yourself permission to “not know” is a great gift.

Everyone loves the crystal ball.  A decision to suspend knowing makes space for magic.

Mistakes could be categorized as the process of learning what works for you, and what does not. The best way to find out is: Do it and see what happens! There are many professions called a “practice” because that’s what they are. The practice of learning, refining, teaching and coaching movement is no different. The key is not only practice, but what is learned from the practice.
People continually suffer from the idea that they “should have known” about something before experiencing it. That’s a great way to never live life at all. If you knew it was a mistake going in, of course you would’ve done something different! So, making an error doesn’t matter, but how often the same mistake is repeated certainly does.

Fear of criticism

First, fear of the criticism or blame that can surface when a mistake is made, especially if it’s happened before, can become confused with genuine danger to existence. So, we freeze or stay silent. Real solutions elude us, and progress stagnates. Inevitably, this reaction to a dilemma sets the stage for a rerun. The vital sense of engagement in life, including opportunities to make valuable contributions and truly share your talents, actually fades when fear starts making all the decisions.

Regrets

Regrets are interpretations of the past that cripple people in the present. The admonishment of “don’t screw it up this time” is a misunderstanding of the primary lesson of any mistake: To learn about yourself through a challenge rather than to control an outcome. The willingness to jump in and try again with a better approach ultimately determines more successful results than any other action. This willingness is a quality that great leaders share.

Consistency yields success

Consistency fosters an appreciation for the ebb and flow with all things. The lesson moves from head to heart when it is realized that no error determines someone’s value as a human being. Come rain or shine, plus or minus, praise or blame, proxy or default, success in any endeavor in showing up and doing what is necessary on that day and in that moment.
The study of movement, and progress in any fitness program for that matter, is simply refining the practice of working with each other and yourself. Getting out of your own way is to cultivate the habit of equal regard for both yourself and others. This is a triumph in any given circumstance.

The moment of truth after a mistake comes with the choice about what to do next…every time. It is summarized in three words: Do, Learn, Practice.

Previously Published April 2013

Leadership – valuing mistakes

 

Diana Bailey Essential Motion Pilates

By Diana Bailey

“A man must be big enough to admit his mistakes,
smart enough to profit from them, and strong enough to correct them.”
-John Maxwell

We, as a culture or a corporation, don’t teach people to value their mistakes. The focus is placed on success rather than the learning process that achieves it.

Disdain and criticism are common responses to an error. The overall message is that mistakes are bad, disliked, wrong or stupid, and people who make them are too. That’s not much of a value since it absolutely flies in the face of reliable, objective experience from some of the most accomplished and successful people on this earth.

Hundreds of life stories acknowledge one simple reality:The final outcome in a situation is predicted by the response to the mistake over the mistake itself. Mistakes are a place to begin. Admitting one is a great start. Realizing how to use the lesson is a turning point. Acting on that insight begins with the courage to see rather than look.

“Mistakes are always forgivable,
if one has the courage to admit them.”
– Bruce Lee

Keep in mind that the ability to acknowledge an error by saying, “I was wrong” neither absolves someone else of wrongdoing nor concedes any degree of “rightness” to their actions. To admit that you did something that did not work out the way you thought it would acknowledges your decision about only your personal words and actions. That is the essence of both accountability and responsibility. Conversely, to say “You are right” means you agree with the actions, words, and decisions of another. Be aware of this distinction.
“People may forget what you did,
but they will never forget how you made them feel.”
– Maya Angelou

Right and wrong are not a teeter totter defining the balance of power or superiority in a situation, although this often appears to occur. People will go through astonishing contortions to claim the supposed righteous moral high ground, and feed the implied message because of the deep seated human desire to be valued and appreciated by others. Watch closely and notice how good and bad get piled on top to question belonging, community, teamwork, or friendship while like and dislike wrap it all up in a box to avoid further review by anyone.

This approach is lacking a critical reality check:
Respect and trust cannot be assigned, only given and earned.
Problems get solved more often when people are safe to express ideas. Being “right” does nothing to inspire learning or build creative problem solving skills because it directs the focus away from ideas. Giving your self permission to play or experiment, without necessarily deciding on the immediate value, builds confidence and invites others to engage their own ideas. The cumulative results of this approach are reflected in progress, potential, and solution.

“Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes.
Art is knowing which ones to keep.”
– Scott Adams

The person who listens, respects, acknowledges and attends to the issue rather than attempting to categorize anyone,including themselves, attracts solutions like a magnet. Leaving space for a situation to unfold or a direction to be revised is the art of life.

 Mistakes happen even in the best of situations. So expect them, accept them, and do something to fix ’em!

Real leadership knows that setting a course means decisions have to be made according to what works rather than individual likes or personal popularity. There is so much that defines what it is to be human that mistakes must come with the territory. Responsible leaders  admit it, accept it, and move on. No more and no less.